Breaking

Amazing traditional Rwandan hairstyle by Amasunzu, 1920-1930


Amasunzu is a traditionally Rwandan hairstyle that was once worn by men, as well as by unmarried women to indicate to potential suitors that they were unmarried and of marriageable age. The hair is styled in crests and is often described as a crescent shape.

There are over thirty different styles of amasunzu, worn by both men and women and often symbolize their different roles and status in the community. For men, the Amasunzu would show his power, bravery and nobility as well as prestige. When worn by women, amasunzu was intrinsically associated with marital status and virginity and was only worn by teenage girls until they were married. After marriage, some women allow their hair to grow freely.

In a book by Mary Beatrice Umutesi, Surviving the Slaughter: The Ordeal of a Rwandan Refugee in Zaire, it mentions a man who was briefly held in a Rwandan prison and in exile in Burundi because: "His behavior was considered subversive by the authorities, who blamed him for wearing a beard and getting the required Amasunzu haircut."

The Amasunzu style was designed by cutting some hair down the middle, then leaving it to grow out. Some designs look like circles in circles while some look like walls behind walls. People liked to get creative in the way they wore amasunzu, and many villages held competitions to decide the best design. Children dreamed of the day they would be old enough to wear a hairstyle.

Amasunzu is much more than a style choice and according to East African: "Rwandan etiquette is based on the nature of the body. This style was used to reflect such important aspects as might, cleanliness, and virginity for unmarried girls. This It was also a way to show class; powerful leaders, nobles and the wealthy wore the hairstyle."

The Amasunzu hairstyle, which has now largely lost its meaning, is slowly becoming popular among those who see it as a way to glorify the lost Rwandan culture after colonialism and the Rwandan civil war. Amasunzu is a traditionally Rwandan hairstyle that was once worn by men as well as unmarried women to indicate to potential suitors that they were unmarried and of marriageable age. The hair is styled in crests and is often described as a crescent shape.

There are over thirty different styles of amasunzu, worn by both men and women and often symbolize their different roles and status in the community. For men, the Amasunzu would show his power, bravery and nobility as well as prestige. When worn by women, amasunzu was intrinsically associated with marital status and virginity and was only worn by teenage girls until they were married. After marriage, some women allow their hair to grow freely.

In a book by Mary Beatrice Umutesi, Surviving the Slaughter: The Ordeal of a Rwandan Refugee in Zaire, it mentions a man who was briefly held in a Rwandan prison and in exile in Burundi because: "His behavior was considered subversive by the authorities, who blamed him for wearing a beard and getting the required Amasunzu haircut."

The Amasunzu style was designed by cutting some hair down the middle, then leaving it to grow out. Some designs look like circles in circles while some look like walls behind walls. People liked to get creative in the way they wore amasunzu, and many villages held competitions to decide the best design. Children dreamed of the day they would be old enough to wear a hairstyle.

Amasunzu is much more than a style choice and according to East African: "Rwandan etiquette is based on the nature of the body. This style was used to reflect such important aspects as might, cleanliness, and virginity for unmarried girls. This It was also a way to show class; powerful leaders, nobles and the wealthy wore the hairstyle."

The Amasunzu hairstyle, which has now largely lost its meaning, is slowly becoming popular among those who see it as a way to glorify the lost Rwandan culture after colonialism and the Rwandan civil war.










No comments:

Powered by Blogger.